Archive for November, 2010


What’s up, LA?

By Talia DeRogatis

LA Happenings in the months of November and December

Costa returns to House of Blues

Singer-songwriter Matt Costa will return to his frequently played venue, the House of Blues in Anaheim, on November 24 at 7 pm. The professional skateboarder turned musician began his career in 2003 by circulating his demos amongst his friends and neighbors in his hometown of Huntington Beach, California.

Since then, he has released three albums and gained a strong presence in the folk rock world.  His newest album, Mobile Chateau, was released in September of this year and marked Costa’s first time producing an album.

Tickets to see Costa perform his new songs as well as some of his older hits range from $60 to $90.

Slightly Stoopid tour hits the Roxy

Slightly Stoopid will perform their celebrated fusion of rock, blues, reggae, ska and hip-hop on November 20 at the Roxy Theatre in Los Angeles.

The band, formed in 1995 in Ocean Beach, California by childhood friends, still tours frequently despite not having released an album since 2008.

The musicians enjoy touring for the sake of bringing energy and a good time to their fans, not necessarily for promotional reasons.

While influenced by groups such as Sublime, Rancid and Streetwise, Slightly Stoopid has developed a unique style that has fans paying anywhere from $65 to $300 to see them live at the Roxy.

Passion Pit plays at the Palladium

Passion Pit, an electronic pop band from Cambridge, Massachusetts, will perform at the Hollywood Palladium on December 7. The band, whose members attended the Berklee College of Music, derived their name from a slang term for the make-out spot at drive-in moving theatres.

The name reflects the group’s youthful and romantic music, which appeals to all age groups, especially teenagers. With one EP and one album under their belt, the band continues to enlarge its following through singles, covers and live performances. Demand to see them live has skyrocketed in the past year, as evidenced by ticket prices ranging from $60 to $340.

Ok Go set to rock Club Nokia

OK Go, a Grammy Award-winning rock and power pop band from Chicago, will perform at Club Nokia in Los Angeles on November 27.  The band has released three studio albums and gained legions of fans by releasing songs and appearing on television and in movies.  However, the band is probably most famous for their creative and often low-budget music videos, and this creativity is said to come across in their live performances as well.

Opening for Ok Go is A Fine Frenzy, the stage name of singer-songwriter Alison Sudol.  A Fine Frenzy is known for a combination of unique, energetic pop songs and beautiful, haunting ballads.  Tickets to see these two celebrated musicians range from $20 to $130.

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by Nicole Compton

2008 may have been the Year of the Rat in the Chinese lunar calendar, but it has lasted well into 2010 for many teachers and campus residents.

The infestation has yet to be addressed as a serious problem, but the recurring appearances of rats and mice might warrant further investigation.

Teachers Jasmine Love, Martin Byhower, Sandra Piercy and Trish Stevens, along with the entire Global Language department, have had their share of interactions with the rodents most of us despise as potential carriers of the plague.

Jasmine Love, the Director of Multiculturalism and Inclusion, has seen field mice and rats in her office.

Love prefers to use peppermint, instead of deadly repellents, to ward off the animals humanely. She sprinkles dried peppermint behind her furniture seems to ward off the rodents.

“Catnip smells a lot like mint, so if a mouse smells mint, they may think a cat is around” said Love. “That is why if you come to my office it smells very fresh and very minty.”

Martin Byhower, a Middle School science teacher and head of Ecommunity, explains that the rats he has experienced on campus are either the Brown or Black Rat.  These rats are non-native species and the only mammals more numerous than humans in this area.

Byhower is not scared of the rats but is rather frustrated with their tendency to strip the bark off his plants.

“If we didn’t leave food around, or if we allowed coyotes and owls more freedom to repopulate the area, they would be less of a problem,” said Byhower.

History teacher Sandra Piercy and science teacher Trish Stevens have not had problems with the rodents this year but have had their experiences in past years by these unwelcome guests.

Last year, the chemistry room became a nesting place for rats, but the problem was resolved for this school year.

Fifteen years ago, Piercy’s unit where she used to live on campus was invaded.

“I set humane traps and removed at least one mouse per day,” Piercy said.

Appearances in Laverty Arts Center have also occurred. Leslie Miller, the dance and cheer coach, has already caught three mice in her room this year.

These rats have appeared in several locations on different parts of the campus, making it difficult to define a reason for their presence.

Of all of these locations, though, the Global Language Department experienced a major plague of mice last year and at the beginning of this year.

“[Larry] Clement even tried to keep one last year. He was against killing the rats, so he found one and named it Freddy,” said Global Languages Co-Chair and French teacher JoAnn Wund. “Everyone else tried to kill Freddy with the broom.”

Love screamed at the thought of rats invading her office. Maintenance workers found a pregnant rat hiding there. And, soon after that, multiple mice were running around the area.

The Global Languages Department ordered a deep cleaning a few weeks ago and since then has not seen any sign of Freddy and his family.

“We all are happy that he is probably dead, but Mr. Clement still hopes that Freddy is alive,” said Wund.

Despite the distaste of many for the presence of rats, Love and Byhower believe that humanity’s general attitude toward this rodent population is grossly uncalled for and exaggerated.

Byhower explains that the rats in our area very rarely carry disease and are actually extremely smart creatures.

“Animals are never guilty of being ‘evil’ and can’t be blamed for merely trying to survive,” said Byhower. “Rats do especially well because, in part, they are highly intelligent. Disease transmission by rodents in our area is extremely rare.”

Love questions why children are less afraid of pet hamsters than of pet rats, when rats actually make better companions and even have fewer instances of biting their owners.

Love advocates for the use of Chadwick’s core values when dealing with these rodents. “As a community we can embrace the rat, and include him or her at least in the way we have respect and compassion for others,” said Love.

“I don’t mean that we have to include them in our offices and homes, but in our minds as sentient beings worthy of respect.”

It seems as if Chadwick may be taking tentative steps toward accepting these rodents as members of this community.

Those who look to other animals for help with the rodent infestation might have taken some comfort that 2010 is the Year of the Tiger. But next year? The Year of the Rabbit, which begins on Feb. 3, may bring new overpopulation problems of its own.

By Hailey Waller

Upper School English teacher Alan Barstow and Village School teacher language arts teacher Craig Polin teach ninety-minute creative writing classes to prisoners at Central Juvenile Hall in Los Angeles once a week. InsideOUT Writers, the program they work for, aims to give students the “opportunity to refocus their lives without the influence of peer pressure and build their self-esteem.”

Barstow has spent every Saturday since March working with girls between the ages of thirteen and nineteen in the “special handling unit.”

Polin works with the same girls on Wednesday nights. These girls have been charged with such high-risk offenses such as murder or drug dealing. Barstow hopes to provide these girls with an opportunity for self-expression and reflection so they can redefine themselves in society.

An alumnus from InsideOUT Writers who was finishing his high-school diploma at Eagle Rock (the Alternative School in Estes Park, Colorado where Barstow previously worked), introduced Barstow to the program. This young man, who was able to turn his life around and now works as a successful anesthesiologist, inspired Barstow. When he moved to Los Angeles, Barstow remembered the program and got involved.

Upon arriving for the first time to Central Juvenile Hall, Barstow felt intimidated. Security searched him thoroughly before sending him through airport-level security system, metal detectors and all.

“Prison is prison,” said Barstow. “There is nothing welcoming about it. Everything either smells sanitized or reeks of body odor. Prisoners are required to walk with their arms behind their back and may not even go to the bathroom without supervision. It’s shocking and uncomfortable.”

The writing class is voluntary and informal. It takes place in the “common room,” a plain central area where tables are cemented to the ground. Barstow begins by introducing a text that embodies a certain theme. He spends the rest of the class exploring the mean and matter of the text, the same way students are taught at Chadwick.

The first text he brought in was a vignette from The House on Mango Street called “Names.” The name of the main character, Esparanza, means Hope. In conjunction with this theme of names, Barstow asked the girls to write a list of all the nicknames they have acquired in their life and reflect on where they came from, what they mean, and why they matter.

One day Barstow brought lyrics from Jay-Z’s “Empire State of Mind.” The girls chose to spend time analyzing the lyrics and applying them to their lives.

On any given day, some girls may choose to only write a paragraph, and others write continuously and may have up to ten pages at the end of ninety minutes. “It doesn’t matter how much they write,” said Barstow. “But the important thing is that they’re taking the time to process their emotions and write anything at all.”

The opportunities presented to these girls reflect their unstable lives, in comparison to those of students from Chadwick. These girls haven’t had the privilege of growing up with stable families and a safe community like Chadwick. Many of them have been sexually abused or raised in drug-infested homes.

The girls have normal teenage concerns: fashion, boys and friends. They share common wishes: to have money, to feel loved, to feel important. The difference is that they have chosen to be fulfilled in ways outside the legal system, which is problematic.

One of Barstow’s favorite students started working for a drug dealer at eight years old. While Chadwick students were learning their multiplication tables, she made a decision that ultimately ruined the next seventeen years of her life: by getting involved with the wrong people, she landed in prison until she turns twenty-five.

Barstow’s face lit up as he recalled this girl’s reaction to his class: “She has the emotional maturity of someone twice her age. She could take the Perspectives unit I’m teaching my tenth graders and totally rock it. You didn’t even need to give her a lesson plan. She wrote with a raw awareness that amazed me.”

Barstow’s favorite piece that she wrote is called “False Profits.” It explains why she got involved with a drug dealer and how it gave her a “false profit.” After turning eighteen, she was transferred to a new unit for adults, but Barstow still writes to her every six weeks to stay in touch.

Differing in their experiences, some girls who have witnessed shootings and other traumatic events, come to class shaken up and unresponsive. Many, who have been together for long enough, have become friends.

One sixteen-year-old boy has been to 195 consecutive writing classes. “It’s hard to know that these kids have spent the majority of their childhood behind bars,” said Barstow.

“Sometimes I wonder, what are they learning in a prison? My goal is to teach them that there’s hope for them in “the outs” [Juvenile Hall slang for the “outside world”]. What makes my time with them special is that fact that each of them can take ninety minutes to focus on themselves without worrying about what anyo

2008 may have been the Year of the Rat in the Chinese lunar calendar, but it has lasted well into 2010 for many teachers and campus residents.

The infestation has yet to be addressed as a serious problem, but the recurring appearances of rats and mice might warrant further investigation.

Teachers Jasmine Love, Martin Byhower, Sandra Piercy and Trish Stevens, along with the entire Global Language department, have had their share of interactions with the rodents most of us despise as potential carriers of the plague.

Jasmine Love, the Director of Multiculturalism and Inclusion, has seen field mice and rats in her office.

Love prefers to use peppermint, instead of deadly repellents, to ward off the animals humanely. She sprinkles dried peppermint behind her furniture seems to ward off the rodents.

“Catnip smells a lot like mint, so if a mouse smells mint, they may think a cat is around” said Love. “That is why if you come to my office it smells very fresh and very minty.”

Martin Byhower, a Middle School science teacher and head of Ecommunity, explains that the rats he has experienced on campus are either the Brown or Black Rat.  These rats are non-native species and the only mammals more numerous than humans in this area.

Byhower is not scared of the rats but is rather frustrated with their tendency to strip the bark off his plants.

“If we didn’t leave food around, or if we allowed coyotes and owls more freedom to repopulate the area, they would be less of a problem,” said Byhower.

History teacher Sandra Piercy and science teacher Trish Stevens have not had problems with the rodents this year but have had their experiences in past years by these unwelcome guests.

Last year, the chemistry room became a nesting place for rats, but the problem was resolved for this school year.

Fifteen years ago, Piercy’s unit where she used to live on campus was invaded.

“I set humane traps and removed at least one mouse per day,” Piercy said.

Appearances in Laverty Arts Center have also occurred. Leslie Miller, the dance and cheer coach, has already caught three mice in her room this year.

These rats have appeared in several locations on different parts of the campus, making it difficult to define a reason for their presence.

Of all of these locations, though, the Global Language Department experienced a major plague of mice last year and at the beginning of this year.

“[Larry] Clement even tried to keep one last year. He was against killing the rats, so he found one and named it Freddy,” said Global Languages Co-Chair and French teacher JoAnn Wund. “Everyone else tried to kill Freddy with the broom.”

Love screamed at the thought of rats invading her office. Maintenance workers found a pregnant rat hiding there. And, soon after that, multiple mice were running around the area.

The Global Languages Department ordered a deep cleaning a few weeks ago and since then has not seen any sign of Freddy and his family.

“We all are happy that he is probably dead, but Mr. Clement still hopes that Freddy is alive,” said Wund.

Despite the distaste of many for the presence of rats, Love and Byhower believe that humanity’s general attitude toward this rodent population is grossly uncalled for and exaggerated.

Byhower explains that the rats in our area very rarely carry disease and are actually extremely smart creatures.

“Animals are never guilty of being ‘evil’ and can’t be blamed for merely trying to survive,” said Byhower. “Rats do especially well because, in part, they are highly intelligent. Disease transmission by rodents in our area is extremely rare.”

Love questions why children are less afraid of pet hamsters than of pet rats, when rats actually make better companions and even have fewer instances of biting their owners.

Love advocates for the use of Chadwick’s core values when dealing with these rodents. “As a community we can embrace the rat, and include him or her at least in the way we have respect and compassion for others,” said Love.

“I don’t mean that we have to include them in our offices and homes, but in our minds as sentient beings worthy of respect.”

It seems as if Chadwick may be taking tentative steps toward accepting these rodents as members of this community.

Those who look to other animals for help with the rodent infestation might have taken some comfort that 2010 is the Year of the Tiger. But next year? The Year of the Rabbit, which begins on Feb. 3, may bring new overpopulation problems of its own.ne thinks and write, write, write.”

By Chris Stanton

Students and faculty recently traveled abroad to Cambodia and Thailand to attend the International Round Square Conference. The conference’s theme, “We Walk Together,” embodied the purpose of the trip and the conference.

From Oct. 1 to 15, senior Zoé Fiske; juniors Jessie Ralph and Madelyn Tournat; sophomores Katherine Richardson and Catherine Kurtz; freshman David Harris; and faculty members Chad Detloff, John Nordquist and Jeff Mercer journeyed together through Southeast Asia.

The group arrived on October 1 at the Phnom Penh International Airport in Cambodia. Over the next seven days, the Chadwick group partook in many activities and experiences such as playing soccer with Cambodian children, building houses for Cambodian families and experiencing immense culture shock.

However, many of the group members agree that the service they did was the most rewarding aspect of the trip. Over their two full days of service, the group constructed five basic houses for poor, local families outside of Phnom Penh and also visited two local schools to help teach the students English and play games with them.

“Playing soccer with the kids and seeing how different their lifestyle is was really a touching experience,” said Kurtz.

After their seven days in Cambodia came to a close, the Chadwick representatives yet again embarked on another journey, this time to Thailand to attend the conference.

They resided in dormitories in Pattaya, Thailand at the Regents School. In the school’s gym, the Chadwick representitives met other students and faculty from all around the world, and together listened to a variety of speakers.

Most of the group members agree that the conference was both hectic and fun because they were meeting so many people from all over the world left and right.

While in Thailand, the group participated in even more community service. The group was split up and representatives were sent to a variety of locations, including a vocational center for the disabled, a women’s center, a center for children with parents who are unable to support them, a convalescent home, a center for blind people and a school.

As they returned from their international adventure, the group of Chadwick students and faculty couldn’t help but feel a sense of accomplishment.  Not only did they aid communities in Cambodia and Thiland,  leaving a substantial impact on the global community, but they managed to have fun while doing so.

Round Square’s goals were successfully represented in this global experience. The conference exemplified multiple aspects of the organization’s core values: internationalism, democracy, environmentalism, adventure, leadership and service.

Reflecting on the trip itself, the group remained thankful for their opportunity. “I felt so grateful to be able to have such a deep impact on these people’s lives,” said Richardson.

This past week was the finale of the Major League Baseball season. It ended with a new champion and new runner up. The past couple of decades our ears have been filled with Yankee championships, and we had grown sick of it.

The Texas Rangers pulled through and defeated the defending National Championship Yankees in the American League Championship Series, while the San Francisco Giants defeated the Philadelphia Phillies in the NLCS.

Both the Phillies and the Yankees made it to the championship last year, so we were happy to see new teams make it to the World Series.

This World Series was very short and not very exciting due to the large difference is scoring between the two teams.   The Giants won in five games and won most of their games with ease. This easy win was due to the lack of offense by the Rangers, but also the amazing pitching by the Giants. Facing Tim Lincecum, Matt Cain, and Jonathan Sanchez, the Rangers were unable to score many runs.

We both enjoyed this World Series because it did not matter who won because both teams were underdogs. Both teams had not won in a very long time.

The Giants hadn’t won the World Series since 1962, and the Rangers had never won one in their team’s history.

It is always good to see a different team win other than the Yankees. Senior Larry Feygin had this to say about the Giants victory, “The Giants are really cool.Their colors remind me of Halloween, and it is my favorite holiday!”

The Bush family attended every Rangers home game, but it didn’t seem to help them win. George W. Bush is the former owner of the Texas Rangers; he held this position before running for the presidency. If the World Series ever came down to which team had the most Presidents in attendance at a home game, the Rangers would win.

We wish the Rangers much luck in their pursuit for number one.  Next year it is the Oakland Athletics’ turn to win, because of their high level of swagg. We have faith.

Cross Country

By Larry Feygin

The finale of the cross country season is approaching, and both the boys and girls are in line to finish another great year for Chadwick’s historic cross country program. No Chadwick team this decade has been as dominant as Chadwick’s so-called “X-team”, and this year proves to be no lapse in success.

The girls have often outshined the boys in past years, but this year the boys have made up ground to their female counterparts. The boys finished second in league this year, their best finish in several years. They came in second to their league rival Flintridge by only one point during the Prep League finals.

Senior Alec Borsook said, “Our second place finish was definitely bittersweet. It’s the best we have done in a while, but we beat Flintridge earlier in the season for the first time ever. I really could not see how Flintridge made up that extra point in only a few weeks.”

Though they could not pull through with a league championship, fortunately the boys will have a chance for revenge in subsequent races. First they will have to qualify for CIF finals with preliminary qualifiers on Nov. 13, Division Five finals the next week at Mt. Sac and state finals the week after that in Fresno.

The team has gained a lot of respect from its peers this year. Aside from beating Flintridge earlier in the year, the CIF has ranked the team as high as third in their division. Currently they sit at fifth, but Borsook claims this figure does not speak to the truth of their ability.

“Our top three runners have performed consistently every race, but the rest of ourteam has been plagued by injuries,” he said. “Max [Hawkins], Sean [Ouye] and Connor [Dawson] are all great runners, and I think we could have won league and been ranked higher if they were healthy throughout the year. We hope to have them back for our next few races.”

Fortunately, the team’s camaraderie and leadership has been able to pull them through some of their races. The team is led by seniors Alec Borsook, Lucas Lebowitz and Connor Dawson, as well as the new addition Sam Cartwright. The coaches are headed by cross-country guru George Ramos, along with assistant coaches Tyson Sacco, Michelle Babcock and Becky Cherry. Lebovitz said, “We have been running together since June, so our team has improved both from a friendship stand point and a physical one as well.”

The girls have also produced tremendous results. They finished first in league this year again, continuing their dominancy over their counterparts in the prep league. Since 1998, the X-girls have finished first nine times and have nevergotten lower than second.

Senior captain Jaye Buchbinder said, “There has always been a great tradition here in this program. I really did not want to disappoint myself or the school, so I am really happy we won.”

Buchbinder finished first in the league finals at Pierce College. She was followed by sophomores Lauren Ouye, Hailey Waller and Melissa Shadden who came in second, sixth and seventh respectively. Buchbinder has dominated all of her races, but she says the team’s success comes from its underclassmen. “They have really been able to perform well during our biggest races,” said Buchbinder. “Our success as a team depends way more on how they do collectively than where I finish individually.”

The girls’ friendships and stamina have improved just as much as the boys’, if not more.

“We have been able to become the best of friends through all the activities we do, from summer workouts, to bus rides, to the cross-country sleepovers,” said Lauren Ouye. “But we have also shown that we cannot be held back by the more difficult courses that we face later on in the season. Those courses ain’t got nothin’ on us.”

Both teams’ goals are to bring back CIF and state championships back to Chadwick. Cross country excellence has been a long tradition here, and the seniors who have been on varsity since freshman year do not want to disappoint.

“Cross country has been a big part of my life throughout high school,” said Buchbinder. “Victories in the following weeks would be awesome beyond belief.”

Mainsheet: Arielle, what sport are you involved in?

Arielle Levine: I am a competitive rock climber.

MS: What exactly does that entail?

AL:So, there are two seasons of rock climbing. The first season that we are in right now is called “bouldering,”and the second season is called “sport climbing.”

MS: What’s the difference between the two?

AL: The season we are in rightnow is “bouldering,” where it’s a shorter wall, but you climb without any ropes.  Basically, you just see howhard of a climb that you can do where you can get to the top, and you can get certain numbers of points for each climb you complete.

MS: What is the second part?

AL: “Sport climbing” is basically the traditional rock walls that people think of when they think of rock climbing,where it’s taller and you have ropes that you are connected to, but that one is judged and scored based on speed.

MS: When you reach the top of the wall,what goes through your mind?

AL: Well, we have been mainly doing bouldering competitions so far, but what mainly goes through my mind during every competition is, “Yes, I can’t believe I made it!” I mean my hands are usually really stinging by then and my legs are shaking, but it just has a feeling of satisfaction unlike almost anything else that I have ever done, especially whenit’s a climb that I had to try multiple times to get up to the top of.  When I finally get there, it’s very satisfying.

MS: What kind of competitions do you partake in?

AL: Well so far I have been doing the bouldering competitions or American Bouldering Series, and in the American Bouldering Series, you just go. You try to do as many climbs as you can within three hours, and either you are judged by judges or just by other climbers tomake sure  you do the route correctly so you don’t go on rocks you are not allowed to touch.

MS: And how is that scored?

AL: You just get a certain number of points for each climb that you actually complete. You get extra points if you don’t fall sometimes and you can just do it the first time you try. They take your top five, so the five top scoring climbs you do are the ones that count. They add them up, and they see what the top score is in each of the different divisions.

MS: So how have you been doing in these competitions?

AL: I have been doing pretty well so far in the two that I have participated in this year. I have gotten first and second.

MS: That’s pretty cool.

AL: For my climbs, I am a female junior climber, and juniors are sixteen- to eighteen- year-olds.

MS: And how has that been?

AL: So far, I have been doing pretty well. I have a couple more competitions coming up, and I am going to goto regionals in January.

MS: That’s exciting!

AL: Yes, and if I make the top two in regionals, then I will get to go to nationals.

MS: What’s your absolute favorite part about rock climbing?

AL: Just knowing when you get to the top that you really accomplished something and knowing that you have worked hard. We have to do lots of conditioning every workout, and you really have to be strong.

MS: It definitely seems like a difficult sport.

AL: When I get to a new climb that Iwasn’t able to do before because it was just too hard and then actually get to the top of it, I always feel like I’ve really conquered something. It’s a very gratifying feeling.

MS: How did you get into this sport in the first place?

AL: Well, I have always loved rockclimbing. I have always loved it doing for fun, and I never really knew thatthere was such a thing as a competitive rock climbing before, but then I went to the rock gym that I go to sometimes, and I found out. I said, “Oh my gosh,there is a competitive rock climbing team I can join.”  I basically just asked my parents, and I was able to join.

MS:If you could pick one adjective to describe your sport, what would that word be?

AL: Thrilling.

MS: And why is that?

AL: Because you never know if you are going to fall, and especially when you are bouldering and there aren’t any ropes, you can fall a pretty good distance. So when you get up to the top there is just a thrill that you have gotten there, but also when you don’t get up to the top, and you fall that’s a thrill in itself aswell.

 

Football

By Nicole Compton

The boys varsity football team started the season with six consecutive wins.  After winning their first two league games on the road against both Flintridge and Viewpoint, the varsity team played Rio Hondo in a pivotal Prep League matchup that the Dolphins lost 52-24.

Recovering from their loss to Rio Hondo, last Saturday the Dolphins delivered a convincing49-24 defeat to league oppontent Webb.

Chadwick opened league play against a winless Flintridge squad, who came out ready to play for the Gold Cup. On the first play of the game, junior Jared Agnew was beat on an 80-yard touchdown run. The early mistakes continued when junior quarterback Hank Trumbull threw an interception on the team’s opening drive, and Flintridge quickly took advantage of the turnover with a touchdown.

The football team quickly responded witha drive that resulted in a one-yard touchdown for senior Chudi Iregbulem.  After the Dolphin defense stopped a Flintridge drive, Trumbull threw a 24-yard touchdown pass to junior Andrew Knoxthat tied the score at 13.

Just before half time, Flintridge took a six-point lead, 19-13, on a rushing touchdown, but they could not stop Chadwick’s momentum in the second half.  The defense saved the day when they stopped Flintridge four times inside the five-yard line.  On the very next play after the turnover on downs, Iregbulem reeled off a 99-yard touchdown run, and the football team never looked back.  Junior Jonathon Sojo’s interception return for a touchdown sealed the game. Chadwick managed to hold on to the Gold Cup for a second straight year.

Coming off a subpar performance against Flintridge, the Dolphins looked to rebound against a lesser Viewpoint squad. Chadwick jumped out to a 22-point first quarter lead, but couldn’t maintain their momentum. The team only managed six points in the second half, and allowed Viewpoint to move the ball at will.

“Even though we won, the team played a sloppy game, committing 16 penalties for 158 yards. We also turned the ball over 3 times.  However, some individuals shined,” says Junior, Andrew Knox.  Chudi Iregbelum continued his stellar play gaining 149 yards on 15 carries.

Harrison Kidd enjoyed a breakout game and scored his second touchdown of the season to go along with 6 catches for 153 yards.  Defensive stalwart Brian Shaw also continued his dominant play contributing six tackles and an interception.

Coming into the pivotal Rio Hondo game, Chadwick hoped to beat the top-ranked school and use the momentum to propel themselves to a Prep League championship.

The Dolphins jumped out to a 12-0 lead, with a strong passing game and disciplined defense.  However, the complexion of the game was permanently altered when Rio Hondo scored on a 63-yard touchdown pass late in the first quarter.

After an injury to senior Harrison Kidd in the first half, the team had trouble completing passes and became dependent on Iregbulem running the ball.

The Rio Hondo Kares quickly adjusted and were able to shut down the offense, which was using a small repertoire of plays.

Chadwick regained some momentum at the end of the first half when junior Kyle Ulman hauled in a 35-yard touchdown pass from Trumbull.

Just as quickly, Rio Hondo took the momentum back when they scored on a 60-yard touchdown on the very next play.

Rio Hondo scored 27 straight points, Chadwick couldn’t respond, and Rio Hondo went on to win the game 52-24.  The loss ended the varsity squad’s winning streak at six games, reducing their possibility to win a league championship.

The team has to win the last game of the season against Pasadena Poly in order to position themselves for a strong run in the CIF playoffs.

Senior captain Ben Krauss offered his perspective after the loss, “We we’re in the same spot last year regarding our loss to Rio. The only difference now is we have a whole team that has experienced what it takes to fight our way through CIF. I’m not worried.”

Boys Water Polo

By Montana Morgan

Boys water polo looks strong as they finish up their last league games of the season. The team won their spirit game and senior day 13-9 against Milken Community High School on Oct. 27.

“We were all really pumped. There was no way we were going to lose our spirit game,so we all came out as hard as we could,” said junior Blake Range.

Senior captain Cameron Turner believes the team played an amazing game. “We did very well. We started out strong and ended even stronger. It was definitely the most intense game we have ever played,” he said.

Turner went on to say the team performed well both offensively and defensively, “Blake was definitely clutch.” Range scored 6 goals.  “Slim [senior goalie Matthew Jamele] had some good blocks.We just all played really a strong game,” said Turner.

Junior captain Matty Gallas said, “We started out slow and couldn’t put away shots,but we played solid defense. In the fourth quarter we picked it up and put themaway.”

However, senior Thomas Shadden saw the game in a different light.

“Unfortunately, we have not displayed our true strength at our home games.” says Shadden. Jamele agreed, stating that the team played all right but not their absolute best.

The team’s current record is 18-7 after their big games coming up against Milken, Pasadena Poly, Flintridge and LaSalle. The boys claimed victories against Milken, Flintridge and LaSalle but fell four goals short of a win against Poly. “They are our only loss in Prep League, so if we had won that game, it would have put us in a position to finish first in league,” said Gallas. The team finished second in Prep League.

The boys are also looking forward to CIF. Last year, water polo made it to the quarter-finals, and this year they are looking towards another exceptional showing in the playoffs.

“I wouldn’t call us better or worse. We’re different this year. When we had Kurt [Buchbinder ’10] last year, we played with a more isolated offense. This year, we have a more well-rounded starting lineup. Our playing style has changed completely,” said Turner. “Our victory against Crescenta Valley, currently ranked #1 in the division, was a huge revelation to the team that we have achance to win CIF,” said Shadden.

To claim the title, Shadden says the team needs to “perform well consistently and not relax during a game, even if we are playing a team that is not at our level.”

Even Gallas admits the team has some flaws. “One of our main problems is stopping individual players. We play a lot of teams that have one or two good players and sometimes we will allow them to score the majority of their team’s goals,” said Gallas.

He continued to say that they have been working on this problem. “We’ve been working on improving individual defense to help prevent that from happening.” Turner says, “If we train hard every day, give it our best effort, and don’t get distracted, I think we can pull off a CIF title.”

Girls tennis

By Colette de Beus

This year, girls varsity tennis not only ended their league season undefeated, but they claimed the title of Prep League champions and are ranked #1 in the Division 2 for CIF.

Their only loss this year was against Peninsula High School, but the team is quick to point out that it was only their second meet of the season, so the lineup was completely different than it is now.

As for Junior Varsity, they have only lost two meets this entire season: one toWestridge, and once to Poly.

The most challenging match of the varsity season was against Flintridge, but other than that, not many of the competing schools have posed much of a threat. Thisis quite a feat considering the team lost nearly half of its members with the graduating class of 2010.

“The graduation of so many seniors definitely had a drastic effect on the team andon me,” said senior Christina Ling. “I always looked up the grade above me, and I was friends with them, but now that they’re gone I really miss them. This happens every year, for me. I guess you don’t know what you got till it’s gone.”

“Last year’s senior class was really large in tennis, not only by numbers but by influence,” said senior Katie Starke. “They made the team what it was.”

Next year, senior co-captains Madison Webster and Ling will be leaving the team as well.

“I think the team will still be pretty strong and possibly even stronger than itis now with new incoming freshmen,” said Ling. “The team is very young and has lots of time to grow.”

Despite the loss of last year’s seniors, the team also gained a big group of freshmen,including two that have moved up to varsity level since the beginning of the season.

Coach Carolyn Leach is very impressed with the team as a whole this year. “They are very cohesive and supportive of one another, both on and off of the court.  This year’s team has shown a lot of improvement since the beginning of the season in August, and I’m very proud of them.”

“The biggest and scariest moment of the season was in one match when we were missing two of our key starters,” said Ling. Sophomore Montana Morgan was late to the match because she was getting her driver’s license, and junior Madison Sung had injured her arm and was not supposed to play. In the end, they barely beat the other team because Sung ended up playing with her injured arm.

Most members of the team will say that the best part of being on the girls’ tennis team is the team itself.  Because their matches are all off campus, the girls spend lots of time together and have gotten to know each other very well.

“My favorite part of being on the tennis team is by far the team aspect,” said Ling.  “Going to Busters [an icecream shop in Pasadena], having team sleepovers, the car and bus rides home from all of the meets, and bonding over food–all of these were highlights of the season.”

“I honestly don’t know what my favorite part is,” said Starke, “but I do know that for the past four years tennis season has been my favorite time of the year.”

China implements world’s biggest census in ten days

China recently kicked off their once-a-decade census attempting to count every person in the world’s most populated country.

The census is a ten-day whirlwind head count that hires six million census takers to document demographic changes in the country ranging throught 400 million households.

The year 2000’s census counted 1.3 billion people in China, but since then there has been a shift of the migrant worker population from rural areas to the cities.

According to Zhang Xueyuan, Director of Publicity for the Beijing census committee, “Wherever you are living from Nov. 1 to Nov. 10, you will be counted.” This census will be more effective than those in the past because it will determine where people actually live, as opposed to where their legal certificates claim.

Vice-Premier Li Keqiang, the official in charge of the census stated that understanding alterations in populaition can help the government create and edit policies for development throughout the country.

In the past the census has been based on estimation, but the current census will aim to be nearly exact.

The census takers will be going door-to-door asking each family specific questions and vow to reach everyone.

Halloween prank takes a horrible, gruesome turn

A 17-year-old named Tivarus King residing in Atlanta, Georgia was shot and killed after a prank on Halloween night. Authorities say the teen and his friends were throwing eggs at passing cars.

An enraged driver stopped his Mercedes and shot the teen as he was trying to run away. Atlanta police say the driver fired ten shots at King.

The teen died as he was being taken to the hospital for gun wounds in his neck and legs. Investigators found a car matching the description soon after, and its driver was detained for questioning and then later released as innocent.

Under further investegation, 32-year old Fernando Hernadez confessed to killing another man that same evening.  He told the police that he had shot a man whose name has yet to be released.

Without disclosing whether or not the victum had officially partaken in the egging of various vehicles, there is a possiblity that the victim may have been merely an innocent bystander.

by Nikki Stein

The club Student Against Destructive Decisions (SADD) organized an Upper School assembly on Oct. 27 about sexually transmitted diseases. A group of performers from Kaiser Permanente put on a skit to inform students about the effects that having an STD has on the infected person and the people with whom they associate. The skit provided information on how to stay protected from STDs, how to deal with them, and the importance of telling others about a STD.

The leader of SADD, junior Katie Courtney, said, “I thought the assembly was sucessful.  I thought it did a really good job of presenting issues that could be uncomfortable for a lot of people in a more relatable way.  It seemed like most of the students thought it was a good assembly.”

by Larry Feygin

Chadwick completed its third annual Peace4Kids day during the last week of October. The day is one of the several charitable events coordinated by the Chadwick through the Community Service Advisory Board.

Peace4Kids is an organization that gives over one hundred inner city foster children from South Los Angeles fun and educational weekend activities to participate in. The Chadwick Peace4Kids day is just one of several events over the course of the year where the children get to forget about their problems and have fun in a safe environment.

The day is set up like a carnival, with different booths from several cities around the world. Throughout the day, the children, aged six to sixteen, go from booth to booth to experience the best each selected country has to offer in its culture, traditions, and entertainment.

The Community Service Advisory Board (CSAB) members in charge this year were seniors Nicole Stanton, Connor Dawson and faculty CSAB leader Becky Noble. They all had a challenge living up to past Peace4Kids days, which ran very smoothly.

The trio started planning this year’s event last October, shortly after last year’s event ended. Dawson said, “We knew there was a formula for making this successful, so we decided to start as soon as possible. We did it hoping the extra planning would pay off in the end.”

The whole process required many steps in planning. CSAB, the Chadwick Parents Association and the Booster club had to contact the Peace4Kids organization to set up the annual event. Stanton and Dawson also had to reserve the school for the day and had to coordinate parents, students assistants, buddies and planners for the site of each city, along with tour guides for each individual group of children.

The day attracted many people from the Chadwick community, with nearly twenty percent of the Upper School student body involved.

The Chadwick hosts set up exhibits the day before and the morning of. Traditionally, the events have been held outside, but unfortunately rain was forecast, so all the booths were moved to various indoor locations. Although this posed somewhat of an obstacle, Stanton said, “I think it ended up being better despite the rain. The fact that everyone could be close together inside made everyone work together better.”

The day started at ten in the morning when all the children arrived. The children toured the cities for three hours. The cities switch up every year, and this year’s included Seoul, Jerusalem, Port-au-Prince, Dublin, Punta Leon and Vancouver.

The organizers wanted to get cities whose cultures varied as much as possible so as to give the children a true global experience. At the end of the day, all the participants got in a circle and talked about what they liked from the day’s events.

The activities at each booth varied according to the character of each city. For example, at the Dublin booth the children decorated shamrocks and read Irish books, at Punta Leona kids played soccer and created volcanoes and in Jerusalem the children wrote prayers for peace which they put up on the Wailing Wall.

At each booth, the kids learned indigenous dances. Seoul even had their own Korean dancers and drummers, making the experience all the more authentic. Senior Arjun Reddy, who ran the soccer games, said, “I think all these activities worked great in letting the kids have a carefree day. There’s nothing like sports and movement to get one’s mind off of their troubles.”

The year of organizing and all the preparations led to an overall very successful Peace4Kids day. Other than the rain, there were no major stumbling blocks during the day’s events. Peace4Kids day provides Chadwick an opportunity to show its outreach into poorer communities.

“The entire school came together and showed the power of the Chadwick community. We really think serving the community should be a priority in people’s lives, and Peace4Kids day showed how easy it is to make a difference in someone’s life,” said Stanton. “Overall, we I think we did an awesome job of meshing the more prosperous Chadwick community and the inner city kids.”

“Next year’s organizers will have a lot to live up to,” said Noble. “The combination of the planning, the events, and the hospitality of the Chadwick community made this one of the best Peace4Kids days in recent memory.”

by Kelly Lee

Noises Off, a comedy about the production of a play, and the first play of the school year, opens Nov. 12.

Written in 1982 by English playwright Michael Frayn, Noises Off applies the concept of having a play inside a play. In other words, the play itself is ultimately about the production process of another show.

“The play is a rip-roaring British comedy full of love triangles, misplaced items, missed cues and other hilarity,” said senior Molly Heller.

Members of the cast actually plays two characters: working actors or actresses in Noises Off and another character in the play within the play, Nothing On.

Heller plays Dotty, a drama queen who frequently locks herself in her dressing room. Dotty ultimately decides to produce a show that she can star in called Nothing On. Dotty, in turn, plays a hospitable maid named Mrs. Clackett in her production Nothing On.

Within its three acts, Noises Off focuses on different aspects of the production and process of creating a play.

The first act takes place on stage during the dress rehearsal before opening night of the show. The act satirizes common problems and issues that often occur during dress rehearsals: forgetting lines, misplacing props and missing entrances.

The actors and the actresses seem to have no grip on the play and little idea of what is actually going on. Nothing On appears to be unfolding as a complete wreck as hilarious insanity and complications continue to get progressively worse and funnier throughout the production.

The audience should expect lot of doors slamming, confusions and arguments.

The second act occurs one month later backstage during a performance. The cast is in utter turmoil and misadventures take place throughout the scene. The ridiculous relationships among the cast ultimately result in a multitude of off-stage complications which inevitably result in on-stage shenanigans.

The final performance of the show is the quintessence of Murphy’s Law: “Anything that can go wrong, will go wrong.”

The cast includes seniors Molly Heller, Zoe Fiske, Fiona Stout, Lucas Lebovitz and Sander Mora; juniors Zach Blickensderfer and Tom Mirovski; sophomores Monica Haase and Imani Ingram; and ninth graders Margot Zuckerman, Aniger Oriol and Matt Beshke.

Sophomore Austin Welch serves as the stage manager, and Director of the Performing Arts Thom McLaughlin is the director.

McLaughlin recalls the play to be one of his childhood favorites; he and his family thought it was one of the funniest play they ever watched.

“When I first saw it on Broadway with my family, I thought it was the most hilarious play ever. Both my dad and I fell out of our chairs,” said McLaughlin.

Noises Off was also adapted for the screen in 1992 by Marty Kaplan and directed by Peter Bogdanovich. The film adaptation was met with mixed reviews. Some critics believed that the play was too much of a theatrical piece to translate well to a film, while others proclaimed it as the funniest comedy ever written.

Amid the hilarity, some deeper undertones can be found.

McLaughlin said, “I thought that this play gives you an interesting picture of the touring play, where one investor invests a lot of his own money through hiring the director to choose the actors and actresses.”

But, the play remains as the epitome of lighthearted hilarity.

“Some of the actors and actresses in the play are in relationships with each other, some with several people at the same time,” said Haase.

“All of the actors, including the director, get their lines confused, and are really confused the whole time, which makes it all the more comical,” she added.

McLaughlin warns the audience to expect no thought-provoking plot or dramatic undertones. Ideally, the play will generate only laughter and  widespread hysteria throughout the crowd.

As the cast and production team prepare for their opening night, they plan on producing a humorous and  engaging show that will leave audiences laughing for days on end.

Welch said, “Noises Off is a fast-moving, witty British sex-farce that provides an amazing comic relief for everyone!”

by Alex Geffener-Mihlsten

Five Tibetan monks exposed students to a new cultural experience: the creation of a sand mandala. These monks have been travelling around the United States on a tour for more than three months and will be making twelve mandalas in total.

The monks’ stay at Chadwick was much shorter than their time at other places. Tenzin Sherab, the translator and driver for the monks, said, “The sand mandalas that they make usually take about five days. Here, though, the monks made the sand mandala in only two days because they are on a tight schedule.”

The sand mandala is a traditional Tibetan and Buddhist art piece, dating back to the 8th century. Sherab said, “The sand mandala is actually not made of sand. The material that they use to make the mandalas is dyed, ground-up river rocks.”

The monks fill funnels with the finely ground rocks and rub another piece of metal over the funnel. This creates vibrations that let out precise amounts of sand on top of a template that the monks create. These funnels give the monks complete control over the speed of the sand and where it lands on the table. The end result is a colorful piece of art, with many lotus flowers and other intricate details.

The monks’ names are Geshe Jampa Tenzin, Geshe Lobsang Thupten, Lobsang Tseten, Lobsang Dhonyoe and Thupten Nyima. “Geshe is not part of their names, but it is their title. It is like a Ph.D. title,” said Sherab.

These monks were born in Tibet, but now live and practice Buddhism in southwestern India. Their monastery in India is called Drepung Loeseling Monastic University. Currently, the Chinese have a military occupation in Tibet, making it impossible for these monks to return to their country and practice their religion there.

The creation of this sand mandala is extremely important in the Buddhist religion. There are many sand mandalas that can be made, but Chadwick asked the monks to make a sand mandala for compassion.

“The sand mandala for compassion is the most popular,” Sherab said. “Everyone wants to have a little more compassion in their lives.”

The sand mandala is created with the intention of helping people understand important aspects of life. “The mandala is more than just creating a beautiful piece of art. It teaches lessons about compassion, patience, and peace,” Sherab said.

Another important part of the art of the sand mandala is its destruction. After the monks create the sand mandala, is it brushed away and throw it into a river. Sherab said, “The reason why they work so hard, and then sweep it up and throw it into the river is to show that nothing is permanent. It shows the impermanence of life, and the fact that nothing will last forever.”

After the mandala was destroyed, students could take home a little bit of sand from the art piece, and the rest was taken to pour into a river.

“We also want to teach a message of concentration and patience. It takes a lot of concentration and patience to create the sand mandala,” said Sherab.

Many students went to see the sand mandala, and it had a strong effect on them.

Sophomore Austin Welch said, “I thought it was an incredible experience to see another culture being brought to Chadwick. I thought it was amazing that they worked so hard to create the sand mandala, but in the end, they were willing to sweep it up and throw it into a river. After seeing the monks create this masterpiece, I felt enlightened. I felt connected to the cultures around me.”

Many other students felt inspired by the monks to improve their life. “It makes me feel great that there are people out there who are capable of doing what those monks can do,” sophomore Austin Welch said.

“Life moves so fast that it is easy to get caught up in it. The way they slowed down was completely life changing. I am not sure if their lifestyle is right for me, but if I could, I would definitely want to learn to be like them.”

After only two days, the monks left Chadwick, leaving an aura of peace and enlightenment.

By Nicole Stanton

So, seniors—another task for your “to-do” list. You can put this one up there with college supplements, SAT practice tests, interviews, countless essays, schoolwork, college counseling meetings, sports practices, and of course attempting to have a social life. The task: creating a senior page.

The assignment itself seems pretty simple. Put some pictures of you and your friends on a page, and Google a quote if you’d like. But if you’re like most Chadwick students, you tend to overthink things. In reality, we are actually being asked to encapsulate four years of high school memories onto one page. Herein lies the challenge.

Imagine opening your yearbook in twenty years. You’ll have one page that entirely represents your high school self. You will show your children, and in their minds, that page will let them see who you were so many years ago. Then, consider your classmates. We have spent four years together and have shaped each others’ lives whether or not we care to notice. That impact is entirely permanent even if you never again see the girl who sat next to you in math class. Your only window to take you back to this time, right now, and the people who define your high school experience, is the yearbook. Memories serve us well, but we won’t always remember who was on our volleyball team or what our history teacher’s name was. We realize the importance of the yearbook for ourselves, but we must also realize that it’s the same for every other member of our class. The girl who sat next to you in math class will remember you based on that page in the yearbook. So, the question is, how do you want to be remembered?

Our concerns over our senior page right now will be considered trivial in a matter of time, but in the present they are fairly monumental. Despite what we try to convince ourselves, being hurt by exclusion isn’t something that only happened in middle school. It might have hurt a little more then, because our self-esteem was beyond fragile, but even as seniors in high school you still get that wave of sadness when you don’t get invited to a party or when you’re sitting alone on the lawn and everyone is out to lunch without you. Those invitations are just temporary. The party will pass, and everyone will get back from lunch in an hour. Being excluded from a senior page, however, is permanent. And as much as you don’t want to be the excluded, it is even worse to be the excluder. This task is nothing but daunting. How are we expected to include everyone who is important to us? Most of us would need the entire yearbook to give credit to all those who deserve it.

Then consider your personality. As teenagers we are entirely complex beings. Our personalities are nothing but planar, and each one of us represents a multi-dimensional persona. Just one person could be an athlete, an actor, a math genius, and Harry Potter obsessed. Now, do you choose which part of you is most important? How does this work? Is it okay to make the page funny? Should you want to be remembered as the comical one? But, what about the times when you’re entirely serious? That’s a part of you—shouldn’t it be represented? You want your children to realize that you weren’t the girl who just “let the good times roll.” You want your classmates to remember more than your name and what your face looked like. But how?

So, you now face the challenge of fitting your personality, your friends, your favorite memories, your family, and the quote that changed your life onto one page. Here’s the answer: step outside of your over-think-everything Chadwick personalities and be yourself. For something like this, we need to realize that it’s impossible to achieve “enough.” No matter how finely crafted, there will always be one friend you left out or a better quote you could have included. Frankly, as seniors in high school we don’t even have the time to attempt “enough.” The deadline is fast approaching, and few of us have even started encapsulating ourselves onto a page. Let’s put things into perspective. Yes, the page is incredibly significant and we realize that. But in reality, this page is not what we’re leaving behind. It’s not so essential that the girl who sat next to you in math class remembers every aspect of your being. What’s more impactful is the legacy you have left behind. It’s the clubs you started, the changes you made, and the people whose lives you helped shape that will be your memorial. This page is just a piece of that.

By Ari Kassardjian and Larry Feygin

Stumped with deciding on our next guido-filled culinary destination, we took to the streets and asked some of our best buds for their recommendations.

When we asked Ryan “Nala” Duncan for a suggestion, he repeated over and over again “Sandos,” which he described as “a hole in the wall, having only three seats, and with Connect-Four.” Larry originally had other plans in mind, but Nala’s great rhetorical skill convinced both Ari and Larry to take the risk and head to Sandos.

With Ari, Larry and Luigi piling into the Mini Cooper, we set off once again to Manhattan Beach. Larry wore a neon orange shirt and could barely fit into the Mini with the massive girth of his body and length of his legs. After this threesome finally reached Manhattan Beach, Nala and Hammerin’ Hank Trumbull joined us to turn this threesome into a big party.

We luckily found parking right outside Sandos on the corner of Highland and Rosecrans. The outside of the restaurant was Rastafarian colored, reflecting Sandos’ relaxed atmosphere.

Hank, wearing his bro-tank and swim trunks, threw open the door and exclaimed, “Ahoy, broskis!” to which the attractive lady behind the counter replied, “Hey, Hank, your THC will be right up.” Turns out, however, that Hank was not ordering marijuana, but a turkey, ham, and Cubano sandwich. The fact that it happened to be a sandwich salvaged Hank, especially after “Randy Speaks” gave his marijuana talk earlier in the week.

Not being regulars, Larry, Ari, Luigi and Will went with their gut instincts on their food choices. The menu only listed the day’s specials and Sando’s all-time great concoctions, which made it easier on the four to choose what to eat. Among the other things we heard about Sando’s was the fact that the THC and the OBS (Original Breakfast Sandwich) were must-gets. Ari followed Hank with the THC while Will and Nala got the OBS. Larry got the “Tig-ol-Bitty,” Sando’s’ play on the classic Philly cheese steak, while Luigi got himself the Eastwood Burger. He said he got it because “Clint Eastwood was AMAZING in Million Dollar Baby. I was hoping that the burger would give me the same pizzazz that Eastwood gave Hillary Swank in the movie.”

One of the best parts about all of our sandwiches was the bread. The crusty crucible provided a nice contrast in texture to the melted cheese and tender meat inside. The Guidos have often found that bad bread can turn a good sandwich into a soggy mess.

The THC got Hank and Ari high in all the right ways. Ari said, “Forget Prop 19. I’m proposing a bill that makes all convenience stores sell the THC.” The turkey, ham and cheese were all pronounced in flavor, making the ensemble into a memorable sandwich.

Larry’s Tig-ol-Bitty was made with freshly shredded beef, smoky bacon, and provolone cheese. The sandwich was studded with French fries throughout, giving Larry a pleasant textural and sensual surprise. He said, “I rank it much higher than Big Mike’s cheese steaks. The cheese steaks there last year were good, but the beef in the ones here is of much higher quality.” Because Larry has never been a finisher, some of his sandwich remained untouched. Nala and Will got the OBS to watch their spectacular figures since breakfast sandwiches are half the size of regular ones, but the bacon, sausage, eggs, fries and cheese more than made up for the lost calories. Luigi liked his Eastwood burger, but described it as “grintristing,” since he was somewhat unfamiliar with Western style burgers.

Overall, each and every sandwich was a winner. The fact that we could all sit on a counter looking over downtown Manhattan Beach and the ocean made it all the better. Best of all, the Eastwood burger gave Luigi enough courage to find his long lost brother Mario, who happened be a Filipino guy in a karaoke bar down the street dressed in a Mario costume.

What the Guidos loved most about Sandos was the modesty that it showed in its greatness. They have a high rating on Yelp, made the cover of Los Angeles magazine, and were mentioned in the Los Angeles Times, yet only one of these honors is hung up in the restaurant. In addition, we found out that they only use local products from their website, in contrast to gourmet sandwich shops that take every chance they get to advertise their focus on local products. In the end, we thought Sandos truly did redefine the sandwich. As goes their motto: “Sandwiches aren’t sandwiches anymore, they’re Sandos.”

Democracy by Austin Welch

Democracy is alive in America—and it isn’t going away anytime soon. Our forefathers established this country as a government of the people, by the people, and for the people. Over 200 years later, that dream still lives on. Many successful political movements have been started by normal, working class citizens fighting for their best interests. We have one vote for every man or woman regardless of race or religion. Being rich doesn’t give you any more say than a person living on the streets. We live in a democracy where it is not only your right, but also your responsibility, to run for office, and we see that everyday.

If you go by the definitions, it is obvious that the free and equal right of every person to participate in a system of government is still alive and well. However, one may say even though anyone can run and vote, it makes no difference because the ads bought with rich people’s money will sway others’ votes. Make no mistake, it takes money to run an election and get your message out, but with a persuasive enough platform, you can raise money in small increments. Plus, if you can sway people enough with large enough microphones, anything is possible.

One of the most resent examples is the “Rent is 2 Damn High Party” led by Jimmy McMillan. He had nothing more than an idea, a catchy name, and a microphone to spread his message. Even though he didn’t win, he brought up a debate. Has the cost of housing become too much of a burden on those who are poor? His website has had over 21.5 million hits. He is giving a voice to many people who would otherwise have been silent. He is the perfect example of how an interesting idea with some theatrics can change the way we think.

The recent prop 19 battle to legalize marijuana was fought not with money, but with arguments on different platforms of the media. On TV, many major cable news shows such as CNN, FOX News, and MSNBC brought “experts” to debate. This battle was fought with less than $100,000 for the NO on Prop 19 campaign, and less than $1.6 million dollars on the YES side. For a statewide battle, this is nothing, and it still sparked debate. Even though the proposition failed, it was a giant win for those who want the decriminalization of marijuana. With next to no money, they started a discussion about a social issue. If America is a plutocracy, there would not be anything close to a debate. This shows how little money is needed to change the country.

There are many points against America being a democracy, and the one that comes up often is that the rich influence media coverage. Even though in some cases this may be true, the public has more control than you might think. When a story breaks, anyone can go to hundreds of different news sources, from TV  to the Internet, and the number of sources prevent overbias. As long as we don’t consolidate news coverage to fewer media outlets, there will never be a monopoly on our media. As long as we can go to a dozen different places to get our news in fewer than fifteen minutes, the rich will never monopolize our news.

If America has become a true plutocracy, you would be able to buy a seat of power. That, however, has been disproved by the recent defeat of Meg Whitman. This is the best example of democracy beating plutocracy. Whitman spent about $150 million to get elected Governor of California. If America really was a plutocracy, she would have won with record numbers. Even with all the ads on TV, Internet, and radio, she still lost. Political pundits may say that it was because she had scandals, but the real reason is that every person has one vote. Add one vote to another enough times, and no amount of money can stop democracy. That is why America is, and always will be, a fair and equal democracy.

 

Plutocracy by Michelle Cerami

America has always prided itself in being the land of opportunity. Since the country’s founding, immigrants have sought opportunities and fortune in this country, with and without success.

Now, in the modern day, people who immigrate to this country still come for success. However, there is no way they can achieve it—America has become a plutocracy.

Early America strived to achieve an equal opportunity democracy that benefitted not only the country, but also the people. The founding fathers made sure that every citizen in the United States could be able to prosper, and prosper some did.

Currently, it is hard to prosper in the United States. The education system fails its students, seeing as students in the United States score low on standardized testing. Even third world countries like Costa Rica have a higher literacy rate than the US. How can we claim to be a land of prosperity and opportunity if third world countries outperform us in education? How can we expect immigrants to prosper in the United States with our poor education system?

The wealthy are able to afford a proper education for their children. Meanwhile, immigrants are left sending their children to a failing public school education system with minimal funding. Education is the key to success in this country, so the wealthy rise ahead and become our leaders in government. This leaves the immigrants left behind and confused. Where is this land of equal opportunity and fortune that they have been promised? Where is the equality in government representation, if the lower class does not have the tools to rise in society? How can we call ourselves a government with representation, if there is no representation for these immigrants?

Our country was founded with the right intentions. Our founding fathers sought to create a society of equal opportunity with no bias. In those days, the bias was towards religion, which was why the settlers sought to leave England in the first place. These days, I believe, the persecution and bias is not only towards religion, but race and socio-economic status. I tutor at Wilmington Middle School, and their literacy coach, Mrs. Sachs, has told us that their main goal is to give them a proper education to direct them towards college and a job. However, some public schools maintain the mindset that a certain group or sects of social economic status are not going to perform, and then they don’t. You must believe it is possible in order for it to be achieved. This is where I believe our plutocratic government has gone wrong; they continue to cut funding from schools such as Wilmington Middle School, and by doing so, lose the opportunity for students of said immigrants to rise in society and wean off of government dependency.

The government provides financial and medical assistance for those not financially able. Therein lies the problem—the more assistance you give a person, the more dependent they become. If you do not give people the tools they need, like education, there is no hope for them to ever be truly independent from the government’s aid; it is a vicious cycle that will cease to end.

As Americans, it is difficult to look at this issue without being defensive. Of course, we would love to think that we have a perfect democracy that caters to all members of our country, but this is not the case. The United States does not have a perfect democracy—we have a plutocracy that fails all members of society. To fix this issue of plutocracy, however, we will need to address the issues in our public education system. The only way all members of our society will be treated equal is to have a better pubic educational system.

Wednesday. 12:25 pm. Laverty. Yes, we are all accustomed to the typical G period assemblies conveniently placed right before lunch just when our tummies start to grumble. Some assemblies have proved themselves to make our eyelids feel as if they weighed 200 tons.

However, we know that we speak for the majority of the Upper School student body when we say that it was difficult to avert our eyes from the stage during the most recent G period assembly on Oct. 27.

And who can blame us? Dancing condoms, exploding bottles of lube, giant-sized bananas—talk about abounding entertainment for a high school crowd. Looking around at the students in grades 9-12 in Laverty, there was not one student in the house who was taking advantage of the usual cat-nap opportunity.

From the set that resembled a collection of huge ipods to the pop music playing during the scene changes, Kaiser Permanente’s production of “What Goes Around” proved to be one of the most captivating assemblies the student body has seen in a while. Each of the five actors had us sitting at the edge of our seats on that Wednesday afternoon. Their energy and drive to convey their important messages to high school students radiated through their performances.

As shocking as it may seem that a school would allow this mature content to appear on a high school stage, we are pleased that Chadwick agreed to put this show on. Moreover, we feel that it is Chadwick’s responsibility to host such a show because we believe it is important to educate students about the things that “go around.”

In this day and age, the sexual activity among teens is rampant, and Chadwick, contrary to what idealists may believe, is no utopian exception to that fact.

Sure, there were sections of the performance that made some students a little squeamish. Nevertheless, we would like to take the time to give many plaudits and a hearty pat on the back to the administration for acknowledging the importance of sexual education with regard to contraception and birth control.

It would be unfortunate to see a student become sexually active without having the proper knowledge about safe sex and how their actions can render some life-changing consequences.

Ignorance may be bliss sometimes, but when it comes down to something as significant as life-long health, knowledge is truly power.

So bravisimo to the powers that be, the people in the administration who brought this group of talented and passionate people to our stage.

By Hank Trumbull and Jim Simmons

In our bro-packed lives we sometimes find ourselves lounging around and doing nothing. While this is relaxing most of the time, bros always need action in their lives and we are constantly looking for new activities.

After spending enough time making stupid comments on Facebook, we realized that we needed to be using our time more efficiently. We made list of all the fun things we do when we are bored, and it is time to share our knowledge with everyone.

If you ever find yourself mashing your potatoes for excessive amounts of time, refer to our list of Bro-tivities that are fun for everyone!

1. Making New Friends- Whether they are from Peninsula High School and you meet them on MySpace, or they are from El Segundo and you meet them on Chatroulette, making new friends is always fun to do. It is always great to have friends to talk to on the Internet.

2. Puzzles- Complete a fun puzzle with your friends. Senior Harrison Kidd holds the school record in the puzzle competition when he finished a puzzle in forty-five seconds. With Mainsheet alumni Mark Kassardjian now gone, Kidd will now be the fastest finisher at the puzzle Olympics.

3. Game Show Network- Nothing like watching an amazing game of Deal or No Deal. Our favorite is kicking back and watching some exciting deals being made. Once this gets boring, you can switch to ESPN, which is a bro favorite.

4. Watching a Movie Marathon- One of our favorite activities on a Saturday is to cuddle up with three other friends at James Calhoun’s house with a bowl of popcorn. We watch lots of movies, and when we get bored of one movie we just switch to a different movie.

5. Experiment with Make-up- This is junior Matty Gallas’s specialty. He has been known to experiment with powder makeup on his face. “I like to look like a ghost!” said Gallas.

6. Dancing in a Bathroom- Whenever we are bored at school, we all go to the bathroom and have a dance party. Roessler bathroom is always a great meeting spot during long block periods. “I love dancing in the bathroom!” says freshman Brad Boboc.

7. Making Bets with Friends- There can be bets about anything, but in the end make sure that you always pay your bets. With enough money, people will eat things off the ground as senior Nicole Stanton did.

8. Bake a Cake- Bros sometimes need to show their softer side by making baked goods. By baking, we can express our love for eating and impressing women at the same time. This activity can become manlier and more fun if you throw the baked goods at a friend like Matty Gallas.

9. Going to the Beach- Going to the beach is a win-win for everyone. You can hang out with all your friends behind the lifeguard stand, and have memories that will last a lifetime. Going to the beach is also a key step in the GTL lifestyle (Gym, Tan, Laundry).

So this weekend, don’t sit around and do homework, but go outside with friends and have a good time!

Always remember to be safe and respectful of others, because sharing is caring and nobody likes a Negative Nancy. So when you are bored, turn that frown upside down and go take part in some bro-tivities.

By Jasmine Love

Back in the early Sixties, (yes I am that old), I went to what we then called “private” schools. My parents felt that as African American Indian children, it would be better for my siblings and me to attend a private school, especially given the climate in the country.                                     If you know American history, you know the Sixties were turbulent times with a lot of violent tension between different races that sometimes spilled into schools.

I was born during the Civil Rights movement, six years before Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated.

Integration was still a new concept for many people, and the public schools in the city where I grew up were not particularly safe places for children with dark skin, either physically or emotionally.

There were parents who did not want their children going to school with African American students, and even some teachers who thought that we were not as smart.

So my parents researched and chose a private school where they hoped their children would be safe and receive an equal education. There we were able to embrace our African and Indian roots.

There were only four students “of color” in my school, and two were related to me. It was very difficult being in the minority and feeling every day like there was a big spotlight on me.

Now over 40 years later, (I told you I was old), I choose to work in independent schools, and like my parents, feel they can be places where everyone is accepted and feel like they belong.

I learned about Chadwick through Ms. Sykes, long before she was thinking about leaving. I held the same job in another school, so she and I would share resources and talk about what our schools were doing.

When she told me Chadwick was looking for her replacement, I jumped at the chance. Not only would I get to teach history, I would also be the “Director of Multiculturalism and Inclusion” just like at my last job. In short, I feel like my job is to help to make sure everyone feels like they belong at Chadwick. AND THAT MEANS EVERYONE!

When I came for my interview, it was the first time I’d been on the beautiful Chadwick campus. I was thrilled to see so many different races and cultures represented. But I also know that you cannot see ninety percent of who a person is, so even more diversity existed underneath the surface.

As I learned more about Mrs. Chadwick, I feel that she was the original Director of Multiculturalism and Inclusion. Seventy-five years ago, she welcomed diverse children of all races and religions into this school, which was unheard of at the time.

I believe that this school has had a big head start in understanding differences, and this means that we can continue to have courageous conversations around issues of diversity.

I believe that every single person is a person of diversity. As people told me their stories, I learned that we have one of the most diverse and interesting groups of students, faculty and staff that I have ever met.

That diversity comes in the form of experiences, age, race, culture, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity (which is not the same as sexual orientation), ability levels, religion, language, region, and on and on and on. We can’t make any assumptions about who people are. In fact, if we let people self-identify, we learn so much more.

Sometimes people feel very uncomfortable talking about differences, but I want to encourage everyone to lean into that discomfort and talk about why. Thank goodness we are not all the same. Being different makes us stronger. But we share a lot of commonalities as well, so I like to find the parallels and intersections.

On a final note, Chadwick is taking fifteen faculty and staff and eleven students to the People of Color Conference and the Student Diversity Leadership Conference in San Diego. What a commitment! I really feel like I’ve landed in heaven.

No, I am not naïve, I know there is lots of work to do, but we are ahead of the game.

I know this isn’t paradise, but in my world, it’s pretty darn close. Plus check it out: teachers get to write in the student newspaper!